Genes in panel

Ataxia and cerebellar anomalies - narrow panel

Gene: KCNA2

No list

KCNA2 (potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily A member 2)
EnsemblGeneIds (GRCh38): ENSG00000177301
EnsemblGeneIds (GRCh37): ENSG00000177301
OMIM: 176262, Gene2Phenotype
KCNA2 is in 11 panels

1 review

Zornitza Stark (Australian Genomics)

Green List (high evidence)

Ataxia is part of the phenotype.

Review of 23 affected individuals in PMID 29050392: some variants are LoF and others GoF, and some genotype-phenotype correlations made. The main differences were (i) predominant focal (loss-of-function) versus generalized (gain-of-function) seizures and corresponding epileptic discharges with prominent sleep activation in most cases with loss-of-function mutations; (ii) more severe epilepsy, developmental problems and ataxia, and atrophy of the cerebellum or even the whole brain in about half of the patients with gain-of-function mutations; and (iii) most severe early-onset phenotypes, occasionally with neonatal onset epilepsy and developmental impairment, as well as generalised and focal seizures and EEG abnormalities for patients with gain- and loss-of-function mutations.
Sources: Expert list
Created: 12 Sep 2020, 4:26 a.m.

Mode of inheritance
MONOALLELIC, autosomal or pseudoautosomal, NOT imprinted

Phenotypes
Early infantile encephalopathy 32, MIM#616366

Publications

Variants in this GENE are reported as part of current diagnostic practice

History Filter Activity

12 Sep 2020, Gel status: 0

Created, Added New Source, Set mode of inheritance, Set publications, Set Phenotypes

Zornitza Stark (Australian Genomics)

gene: KCNA2 was added gene: KCNA2 was added to Ataxia and cerebellar anomalies - narrow panel. Sources: Expert list Mode of inheritance for gene: KCNA2 was set to MONOALLELIC, autosomal or pseudoautosomal, NOT imprinted Publications for gene: KCNA2 were set to 29050392 Phenotypes for gene: KCNA2 were set to Early infantile encephalopathy 32, MIM#616366 Review for gene: KCNA2 was set to GREEN gene: KCNA2 was marked as current diagnostic